Sex and social class differences in mental illness: the case of Hong Kong

Author

Lee, Rance Pui-leung

TitleSex and social class differences in mental illness: the case of Hong Kong
PublisherSocial Research Center, the Chinese University of Hong Kong
Publication DateJuly, 1976
Pages:34
Keywords:

Mental illness

Abstract/ Concluding Remarks:A probability sample of 3,983 Chinese adults in urban Hong Kong were selected in order to study the sex and social class differences in the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms. It was found that there were higher rates of psychiatric symptoms among women than men, and among members of lower socioeconomic groups. Both relationships were independent of age and education. Sex has a stronger association with symptoms than has socioeconomic status.


The factor of achievement-aspiration discrepancies partially accounted for the social class differences in psychiatric symptoms. The control on achievement-aspiration discrepancies, however, led to an increase rather than a reduction of the sex-symptoms relationship. Attempts were made to suggest that in Chinese society, the relationship between sex roles and mental disturbance might be an artifact of the response bias in field studies.

NoteBibliography: p. 1-4
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