Organizational size, structural differentiation and the man at the top in Hong Kong


Author

Lee, Rance Pui-leung

TitleOrganizational size, structural differentiation and the man at the top in Hong Kong
PublisherSocial Research Center, the Chinese University of Hong Kong
Publication Date1972
Pages:19
Keywords:

Businessmen

Abstract/ Concluding Remarks:The relationship between size and structural differentiation is examined using the survey data from a probability sample of 346 industrial undertakings in a developing industrial-urban community of Hong Kong. The industrial units studied are mostly small or medium sized. It is found that size is strongly and positively associated with both the horizontal (departmental division of labor) and the vertical (levels of management hierarchy) differentiation.

To consider the ethnic status of the man at the top of the industrial unit, we find that Chinese bosses are more likely than non-Chinese bosses to establish small sized units, and that Chinese bosses are less likely than non-Chinese bosses to organize a structurally differentiated unit. However, the variable of ethnic status has less effects than organizational size upon structural differentiation. The relationship between size and structural differentiation remains strong and positive, even if we control the variable of ethnic status.


This study contributes to our systematic understanding of the social structure of the industries in the developing World. It is suggested that in the forthcoming studies of the relationship between size and structural differentiation, some additional factors such as technological structure, organizational age, and form of recruitment, should be considered.

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