Social Change, Bureaucratic Rule, and Emergent Political Issues in Hong Kong

Author

Lau Siu-Kai

TitleSocial Change, Bureaucratic Rule, and Emergent Political Issues in Hong Kong
PublisherSocial Research Center, the Chinese University of Hong Kong
Publication DateMarch, 1982
Pages:35
Keywords:Politics and government

Social conditions

Abstract/ Concluding Remarks:

Hong Kong's postwar economic "miracle" has been sustained by a minimally integrated social-political system, the two constituent parts of which are a laissez-faire bureaucracy and a "self-sufficient," atomistic Chinese society. Until recently, this system has operated to keep politically salient issues to a manageable minimum. Secular, asymmetrical changes, however, have opened up cracks in the system; their disruptive effects have become increasingly visible. Because of its overly rapid economic growth, the organizational fabric of the Chinese society has worn away, making it more dependent on the government for need satisfaction. Together with the administrative imperatives befitting a complex industrial society, this dependence furthers the emergence of a professionalized and expanded bureaucracy. The problem of linkage between the government and the Chinese society is aggravated by the inadequacy of existing intermediary devices. As a result, a new style of politics is emerging in Hong Kong, reflecting its troubled structural conditions.

NoteIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 34-35)
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