Research Projects and Publications in CUHK- Anthropology

Research Projects


  • Chinese of Indonesian Origin in Hong Kong and Trans-Regional Networks

  • TAN Chee Beng
    1 December 2005
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    This study aims to study the Chinese of Indonesian origin in Hong Kong and their trans-regional networks with Chinese of Indonesia-related background in South China and Indonesia. Most of these people in Hong Kong are Chinese Indonesian returnees to South China, where they were settled in the various .overseas Chinese farms. in Fujian and Yunnan. Many later re-migrated to Hong Kong. This project will investigate the followings:
    1. The ethnography of the Chinese of Indonesian origin in Hong Kong: population, distribution, nature of community, social networks and association, Indonesia-related cultural life, young people.s cultural identity.
    2. Memory of migration from Indonesia and from mainland China, including the relevance of such memory for trans-regional networks.
    3. The nature of trans-regional/transnational networks with South China and with Indonesia, including social and economic significances. The project will involve qualitative anthropological research, to begin in December 2005 and end November 2006. (AL05602)



  • Chungking Mansions as a "Global Building"

  • MATHEWS Gordon Clark
    1 September 2007
    Research Grants Council (Earmarked Grants)

    Chungking Mansions is a dilapidated building full of cheap guesthouses, restaurants, and retail and wholesale businesses, located in the heart of Hong Kong’s tourist district of Tsim Sha Tsui. It is a center of “low-end globalization” in Hong Kong—it is where small entrepreneurs from South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa come to seek their fortunes--and is perhaps the most cosmopolitan building in the world, with people from across the globe living within its narrow confines. In this research, I seek to understand the people who reside in Chungking Mansions--how they make their livings and comprehend their lives--and Chungking Mansions itself, in the complex roles it plays within worldwide processes of globalization and global trade. I will pursue this understanding through extended ethnographic research: I will live in Chungking Mansions for 300 nights over three years, interacting with and interviewing its residents, and will accompany 12 entrepreneurs in Chungking Mansions in their journeys to China and back to their home countries, in order to understand their lives and trade in a transnational context. The result of this research will be a book explicating Chungking Mansions and adding a significant new perspective to the anthropological study of globalization. (CU07488)



  • Chungking Mansions As a Hub of "Grassroots Globalization"

  • MATHEWS Gordon Clark
    1 April 2006
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    Chungking Mansions is a center of .grassroots globalization. in Hong Kong: it is where small entrepreneurs from Pakistan, Nigeria, and Ghana, among other countries, come to seek their fortunes in limited transnational trade. In this research I investigate the following questions: 1) What has led these sojourners to Hong Kong? What kinds of lives do they lead in Hong Kong, and back in their home countries? How does their sojourn in Hong Kong relate to their senses of global, national, and local identity? 2) Between Hong Kong and their home countries, what exactly are the economic activities they are engaged in, and what role do these activities play in processes of globalization? 3) What can Chungking Mansions as a whole teach us about globalization, and developing/developed societies and their interrelation? I will investigate these questions by a) living in Chungking Mansions for four months (returning to CUHK by day to work) over the course of a year, coming to know sojourners in Chungking Mansions through extended participant-observation and interviews, and b) traveling with several sojourners back to their home countries, to accompany them in their business and personal dealings. I have already had considerable experience in Chungking Mansions, and can ascertain that a) most transnational business conducted by sojourners in Chungking Mansions is legal, and b) Chungking Mansions is a safer place than is generally supposed. I intend to turn this project into a larger, long-term research project, and eventually to write a book about Chungking Mansions. (AL05414)



  • Documentation of Archaeological Artefacts Discovered in Hong Kong

  • LU Lie Dan
    28 July 2007
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, HKSAR Government

    Archaeological excavations have been carried out in Hong Kong for many years, and a large quantity of artefacts has been accumulated. It would benefit both the public and the academic world if these data can be systematically documented to facilitate further research and education activities. Hence a project on documenting archaeological data is proposed. The primary objective of this project is to register and document archaeological data discovered in recent years in Hong Kong. Student of anthropology department will participate in the documentation process, thus the project will also be a valuable training opportunity for students who have some basic archaeological knowledge. The project will be carried based on the documentation standard set up by AMO. Each artefact will be registered, classified, verbally described and visually recorded. The information will be inputted into a digital system. (AL07687)



  • Documentation of Archaeological Discoveries in Hong Kong

  • LU Lie Dan
    20 July 2004
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, Leisure & Cultural Services Department, HKSAR Government

    Archaeological excavations have been carried out in Hong Kong for many years, and a large quantity of artifacts has been accumulated. However, many of these artifacts have not been properly recorded and classified. This project aims to systematically document the archaeological discoveries made in Hong Kong in order to facilitate further research and education activities. (SS04355)



  • Documentation of Archaeological Discoveries in Hong Kong

  • LU Lie Dan
    14 November 2005
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, Leisure & Cultural Services Department, HKSAR Government

    Archaeological excavations have been carried out in Hong Kong for many years, and a large quantity of artefacts has been accumulated. It would benefit both the public and the academic world if these data can be systematically documented to facilitate further research and education activities. The primary objective of this project is to register and document archaeological data discovered in recent years in Hong Kong. Meanwhile, some students of anthropology department will participate in the documentation process. Thus the project will also be a valuable training opportunity for students who have some basic archaeological knowledge. (SS05743)



  • Engendering Ethnic Existence: An Ethnographic Study of Nepalese Women in Hong Kong

  • TAM Siu Mi Maria
    1 December 2005
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    The proposed project aims at understanding the experience of Nepalese women as members of an ethnic minority in Hong Kong, who remain a marginalized social group and often victims of cultural stigmatization. Lacking in the host society.s language and information on the public welfare system, they are faced with problems such as high rates of infectious diseases, notably HIV/AIDS, low employment rate, and low education level. These are aggravated by the gender division of labor in the family, where Nepalese women are subordinated to men due to conservative gender concepts, religious expectations, and social systems of control over female mobility. Cross-cultural research shows that the most efficient means to social development is through the education of women, as they perform important roles as socializers of children, brokers of cultural values, caregivers to family members, guardians of familial wellbeing including physical and metal health, and partners in household finance. This is a pilot ethnographic study in the Nepalese communities in Yuen Long and Jordan, based on in-depth interviews and participant observation, to arrive at a holistic understanding of Nepalese women.s experience as daughters, wives and mothers, and as grandmothers. By comparing the changes over three generations, the study identifies factors that intervene with women.s life stages, and to further seek generalizable implications for other South Asian groups in Hong Kong. Results from the study will inform public policy makers, as well as contribute to the theorization of ethnic relations in urban settings in a globalized world. (AL05436)



  • Fishpond in the Marsh: An Ethnography Study of Fishing Industry in Inner Deep Bay

  • CHEUNG Chin Hung Sidney
    1 April 2003
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    Today, Hong Kong’s only world class wetland conservation site, Mai Po, together with its surroundings, is facing an immeasurable threat resulting from many factors: infrastructural development, aging of the local community, pollution, and fish market competition from mainland China. The impact might bring the decline of the traditional fishing industry, which might even cause the loss of one of Hong Kong’s traditional occupations in the area. The outcomes should not be overlooked. In ten years, we will have less than half of the existing fishponds under operation, while some portions of the land might have gone to infrastructural and residential development. Even though, a large area of marsh will probably be contributed for wetland conservation in exchange for residential development from other developers, there is no overall plan for the natural heritage conservation as well as a sustainable development guideline in the above wetland area. What will happen when all aged farmers cannot work? Who is going to take over the traditional fishpond cultivation so that migratory birds can still come to rest and be fed by food from the fishponds? In order to have a holistic understanding of the socio-historic development of the Inner Deep Bay, and the study of fishing industry should be one the best showcases for relevant conservation issues in Hong Kong. In this project, I seek to document the freshwater fishpond cultivation as a traditional occupation in the area, and to examine the history and social change of the fishing community in Inner Deep Bay, especially the development including rise and decline of the industry during the last few decades. (SS02505)



  • A Multi-disciplinary Study of the Cheung Shue Tan Archaeological Data

  • LU Lie Dan
    30 November 2006
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, HKSAR Government

    Archaeological data have been found at Cheung Shue Tan, Tai Po, at a river site location. These data may represent another type of prehistoric and historic human settlement in Hong Kong. Rescue excavation is being carried out from Nov. 2006 to April 2007. In order to retrieve as much information as possible about the past nature and cultural development in Hong Kong, it is proposed to use various research approaches, including residue analysis, neutron activation analysis, floatation, phytolith and pollen analysis to study the ancient environment and human cultures at Cheung Shue Tan, to provide new information for our understanding of the diversity of prehistoric and historic cultures in Hong Kong. (SS06979)



  • On Learning to Belong to a Nation: A Comparison of Hong Kong, Chinese, and American Young People’s Senses of National Identity

  • MATHEWS Gordon Clark
    1 December 2002
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    “The idea of a man without a nation seems to impose a strain on the modern imagination,” Ernest Gellner has written. However, Hong Kong has been one of the few places in the world in which Gellner’s statement has not applied, at least until 1 July 1997. in this project, I seek to find out how Hong Kong students today describe what it means to belong to their nation, and I seek to compare what these students say with what students from mainland China and the United States say about belonging to the nation. There is a significant difference between the sense of nation as ethnicity held by Chinese students and the sense of nation as civic principle held by Americans. However, a bigger difference is between Chinese and American students, who have been trained since early childhood to “love their country”, and Hong Kong students, many of whom have only recently been learning to “love their country.” How do the discourses of “belonging to a country” vary between and among these three groups of students? How do the processes of their socialization into national identity differ from and resemble one another? Most broadly, to what extent might some Hong Kong students, in their hesitation towards loving their country, represent a colonial past in a present world of national belonging, and to what extent might they represent a globalized future, in which identity comes to be based more on the world market than on the national state? (SS02712)



  • The Origin and Cultural Development of Hong Kong's Earliest Identifiable Inhabitants

  • LU Lie Dan, YUAN Jiarong*, FU Xianguo*
    1 January 2005
    Research Grants Council (Earmarked Grants)

    Archaeological remains illustrate that the earliest identifiable Neolithic occupation of Hong Kong can be dated to approximately 6000 years ago. This project will investigate from where and how these people came to Hong Kong. The project aims to identify the ‘homeland’ (distant or local), the route(s) of movement (if any), and any stimuli for such movements. Thus, we intend to examine the relationships between Neolithic cultures in Hong Kong and those in adjacent areas, to as far away as the Yangzi Basin. The project will also investigate cultural developments after the first Neolithic settlement, and the ensuing formation of localized archaeological cultures. This project will provide foundational data for the beginning of human history in Hong Kong. It will reveal patterns and processes within one of the major episodes of population movement and cultural development in the prehistoric world, this being the development and expansion of agriculture societies, and the effects and consequences of such expansions on prehistoric cultures. In addition, the project will illustrate how prehistoric humans were able to innovate new lifestyles in different environments. (CU04101)



  • The Prehistoric Subsistence Strategies at Sha Ha, Hong Kong

  • LU Lie Dan, ZHAO Zhijun*
    1 November 2001
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, HKSAR Government

    Archaeological data suggest that the human history in Hong Kong can be traced back to at least 6000 years ago. However, the subsistence strategies of prehistoric Hong Kong are still not clear. Were the prehistoric Hong Kong resident hunters and fishers, or were they farmers? When agriculture was introduced into Hong Kong, and by whom? All these are crucial questions for us to understand the Hong Kong prehistory. This project aims to investigate these issues by conducting phytolith and pollen analyses on samples gathered from Sha Ha, an archaeological site going to be excavated from Feb. to April 2002 in Hong Kong. If there are animal and/or shell remains found, these remains will also be analyzed. The objectives of this project are to use multi-disciplinary approaches to investigate the natural resources available to prehistoric Hong Kong residents, and patterns of human adaptation in the forms of subsistence strategies. The outcome will provide essential data for the reconstruction of the prehistory of Hong Kong, and references for studies on the prehistory in adjacent South China and Southeast Asia. (SS01501)



  • Provision of Optically Stimulated Luminesence (OSL) Dating Services for Wong Tei Tung Archaeological Site

  • LU Lie Dan
    16 May 2006
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, Leisure & Cultural Services Department, HKSAR Governmen

    Stone implements were discovered at Wong Tei Tung in Sham Chung, Sai Kung between 2004 and 2006, and have been preliminarily dated to over 35,000 years ago (AMO 2006). If this date is valid, the Wong Tei Tung remains will be the earliest archaeological data found in Hong Kong. However, there are different opinions on this issue. Thus, further studies will be carried out in order to validate the above dating result. Geological analysis will be used to investigate whether the Wong Tei Tung deposits are in their original position or they had been disturbed; Optically Stimulated Luminescence dating will be used to test whether die date of 35,000 years is valid; and typological analysis will be utilized to examine whether die stone tools represent .Palaeolithic stone industry. in terms of manufacturing skills and typological characteristics. The result of this project will provide new data for better understanding prehistoric archaeology of Hong Kong. (SS05588)



  • Recording Wan Chai People’s Culture

  • LU Lie Dan, TAM Siu Mi Maria
    7 February 2006
    The Conservancy Association Centre for Heritage

    Wan Chai is one of the oldest districts in Hong Kong. As it is being redeveloped by the government, many traditional items and properties are rapidly disappearing. In order to preserve some tangible and intangible cultural properties in Wan Chai, we are going to record household items of an old flat in Wan Chai, which has not been renovated since the 1950s. The objectives of this project are 1) to accurately record and describe individual and assembled items in this flat, and to conduct interview with local peoples to collect data about Wan Chai people.s way of life; 2) based on the above data and other published documents, to analyze the meanings and functions of the items. The outcome of this project will be a documentation of the floor plan and household items of the flat. During this documentation process, the flat will be opened to the public to encourage public participation in heritage preservation in order to enhance Wan Chai peoples. sense of belonging and group identity. The outcome of this project will also provide valuable information for the public history of Wan Chai and Hong Kong. (AL05684)



  • Research on Archaeological Assemblages Discovered from So Kwun Wat Rescue Excavation

  • LU Lie Dan
    28 May 2006
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, Leisure & Cultural Services Department, HKSAR Government

    So Kwun Wat is an important archaeological assemblage in Hong Kong, containing data from the late Neolithic to the historical period. In order to retrieve as much as possible information to facilitate a better understanding of Hong Kong archaeology, it is proposed to use various methods to examine the composition of pottery, to investigate the manufacturing skills and functions of the stone implements, as well as to study the textile remains found in So Kwun Wat. The result of this project will provide new data for our understanding of cultural contacts within and outside ancient Hong Kong, as well as the material cultures and life of ancient Hong Kong inhabitants. (SS05776)



  • The Social Construction of Family and Gender: An Investigation of Polygyny across the Hong Kong-China Border

  • TAM Siu Mi Maria, MA Lai Chong (Dept of Social Work)
    30 December 2001
    Research Grants Council (Earmarked Grants)

    This study investigates the phenomenon of baau yih naaih, in which Hong Kong men take Mainland mistresses and set up second households in China. In the past twenty years, there has been a tremendous increase of mobility of personnel and capital across the Hong Kong-China border, ushered in by China’s open policy and economic reforms. While public discourse has attributed the cross-border polygynous relationships to economic discrepancies between China and Hong Kong, and to changes in the occupational structure of Hong Kong, little has been done to systematically examine the underlying complexity of the phenomenon. Paying particular attention to the agency and subjectivities of the individuals involved in the relationships, this research aims to:
    (1) investigate the social and cultural circumstances that contribute to baau yih naaih relationships,
    (2) explore how the relationship is perceived by the persons involved, namely the husbands, wives, and mistresses, and
    (3) analyze the socio-economic and cultural impact on the family and the children.
    The study takes into consideration the interplay of three aspects: family and work structure, concepts of gender roles, and the cultural identity of Hong Kong people vis-a-vis mainlanders. This research will contribute to the understanding of family and gender relations in post-colonial Hong Kong and contemporary Chinese society, especially in relation to mobility and social development. In-depth data from this study will further the knowledge and theorizing of these issues in anthropology and social work, and will be particularly relevant for welfare policy makers and frontline social service providers. (SS01349)



  • The Subsistence Strategies in South China and Hong Kong between 10,000 and 4000 Years Ago

  • LU Lie Dan, FU Xian Guo*
    10 July 2002
    Research Grants Council (Earmarked Grants)

    South China and Hong Kong are important areas with respect to the development and spread of early agricultural societies in East and Southeast Asia. To date, the prehistory of these regions during the relevant time span for these developments, between 10,000 and 4000 years ago, is still only poorly understood. This project aims to investigate the significant economic change form hunting and gathering to agriculture in southern China and Hong Kong, and the causes of, and processes behind this change.
    Be conducting archaeological survey and excavations and scientific analyses on archaeological data, this project will first investigate the natural resources and human exploitation of these resources before the development of agriculture in this region. It will then examine whether rice agriculture developed locally, or was introduced from the Yangzi Valley, and expanded further to Southeast Asia and the Pacific. The project will also investigate whether prehistoric people in southern China were reacting to environmental variation through modification of their subsistence strategies during the transition to agriculture at about 5000 years ago. The outcome will provide essential data for an important chapter of local prehistory, and on past relationships between human, culture and their environments. It will also provide vital information for the origin and diaspora of the Austronesian, which is an important issue on Asian and world archaeology. (CU02196)



  • The Threat of Obsolescence to Freshwater Fish Farming in Hong Kong

  • CHEUNG Chin Hung Sidney
    1 September 2005
    Research Grants Council (Earmarked Grants)

    Hong Kong.s freshwater fish farming industry is facing the threat of obsolescence as a result of many factors, such as infrastructure development, the aging of the local fishing community, pollution, and competition from mainland China. The impact of these factors may bring about the decline of the fish farming industry, and may cause the total loss of one of Hong Kong.s traditional occupations. This would not only mean the loss of the traditional freshwater/brackish fish farming industry, which was such an important part of the postwar social and economic development of contemporary Hong Kong society but also the loss of the important role that the fish farming industry plays in the maintenance of the nature heritage of the wetlands of Hong Kong, which serve as vital refueling stations for many migratory birds that travel between the North and the South every year. In this project, I examine the historical background of this traditional industry to better understand how the social development and local and environmental politics regarding the operation and management of commercial fishponds contribute to wetland conservation and the development of cultural tourism. Taking the long-term operation of commercial fishponds as an example of sustainable natural heritage preservation, I aim to show how the local ecology is socio-culturally related to its surrounding communities, and to explain why freshwater fishpond farming is an essential ingredient in the sustainable development policy of Hong Kong. (CU05592)



  • Tradition in Diaspora: Culture and Selfhood among the Nepalese in Hong Kong

  • TAM Siu Mi Maria
    15 April 2008
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    Tradition provides essential knowledge for identity construction and authority for communities to justify their existence through defining cultural capital. This is important for migrant peoples as they seek to anchor their new social existence. This project examines the tradition discourse, with a focus on the Nepalese community, when the government moves toward building a "harmonious society" with multiculturalism as a predominant theme. In this context, different actors make use of tradition in promoting beliefs and values: The government inculcates ideas of citizenship, Nepalese organizations create feelings of unity and manage ethnic impressions, and welfare agencies promote inclusion. Nepalese individuals give meaning to their lives through practice of traditions in everyday life, simultaneously abiding by and contesting traditional culture. As the government, nongovernment organizations and individuals take part in the construction of a multicultural Hong Kong, they share discourses, symbols, and techniques in the reproduction and invention of tradition. The project looks at how they are connected in the discourse of tradition, and how this discourse is produced and becomes means of unity, transformation, and discord. The project asks: l) How Nepalese organizations and individuals make use of tradition in creating a transnational community; 2) how the Hong Kong government makes the Nepalese as the "other" and the "foreign" fit mainstream society; and 3) the role of non-government organizations in this process. The data generated will shed light on Hong Kong's South Asian minorities and inform policy makers, educators, and social service providers. It also contributes to the building of theory on tradition, migration and displacement, and on the complex relationship between the state, non-government organizations, and individuals in a transnational existence. (AL07887)




Research Publications


  • BOSCO Joseph. "The Anthropology of China: A Hong Kong View". Paper presented in the conference organised by Center for Chinese Studies, UC-B. Berkeley, 2002.03.



  • BOSCO Joseph. Constitutional reform and the future of the Republic of China. (co-authored with Harvey J. Feldman) Armonk, N.Y. : M.E. Sharpe, 1991.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL JQ1521.A2 C66 1991)



  • BOSCO Joseph. "Hong Kong". Countries and Their Cultures ed. by Melvin Ember and Carol R. Ember. vol.2, New: Macmillan Reference USA, 2001. pp.991-1000.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reference GN307 .C68 2001 v.2)



  • BOSCO Joseph. "Hong Kong". Encyclopedia of Diasporas: Immigrant and Refugee Cultures Around the World ed. by Melvin Ember, Carol R. Ember, and Ian Skoggard. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 2004. pp.506-514.
    (CUHK Library Call No: Available Online)



  • BOSCO Joseph. "Magic Masks and Digital Thermometers: Science and Magic in the SARS Crisis in Hong Kong". Paper presented in the Society of East Asian Anthropology Conference, organized by Society for East Asian Anthropology. Berkeley, CA, U.S.A., 2004.11.20.



  • BOSCO Joseph. The making of anthropology in East and Southeast Asia. (co-authored with Shinji Yamashita and J.S. Eades) New York : Berghahn Books, 2004.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL GN635.S58 M33 2004)



  • BOSCO Joseph. "The McDonald’s Snoopy Craze in Hong Kong". Consuming Hong Kong ed. by MATHEWS Gordon and LUI Tai-lok. Hong Kong SAR: Hong Kong University Press, 2001.10.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reserve 2 hours HC428.H6 C66 2001; UL HK Studies HC428.H6 C66 2001 c.2)



  • BOSCO Joseph. "The Reproduction of Anthropology in Hong Kong Under Audit Culture". Paper presented in The Reproduction of Anthropological Knowledge and the East Asian Future, organized by American Anthropological Association, New Orleans, USA, 2002.11.23.



  • BOSCO Joseph. "The Supernatural in Hong Kong Young People’s Ghost Stories". Paper presented in the conference organised by the American Anthropological Association. Washington DC, 2001



  • BOSCO Joseph. "The Supernatural in Hong Kong Young People's Ghost Stories". Anthropological Forum vol.13 (2), 2003.10. pp.141-149.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Periodical GN1 .A652 v.12-13, 2002-03; Available Online)



  • BOSCO Joseph. Taiwan businessmen across the straits : socio-cultural dimensions of the cross-straits relationship. Hong Kong : Dept. of Anthropology, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1994.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL HF3848.C6 B67 1994)



  • BOSCO Joseph. "Teaching 'Chinese Culture and Society' in Hong Kong". Paper presented in the panel "Problems in Teaching East Asia", organized by Society for East Asian Anthropology. Hong Kong, 2006.07.14.



  • BOSCO Joseph. Temples of the Empress of Heaven. (co-authored with Puay-peng Ho) Hong Kong ; New York : Oxford University press, 1999.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reserve 2 hours BL1812.G63 B67 1999; ARL BL1812.G63 B67 1999 c.2)



  • BOSCO Joseph. "Young People's Ghost Stories in Hong Kong". The Journal of Popular Culture vol.40 no.5. U.S.A.: Blackwell Publishing. Inc., 2007.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Periodical AP2.J67 v.40, no.4-6, 2007; Available Online)



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Beyond the Korean Wave: Market Value Studies in Hong Kong of Korean (in Korean)." 韓國文化 (Seoul, South Korea: Kyujanggak Institute for Korean Studies, Seoul National University) vol.38 (Dec 2006), pp.485-497



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Book review on Village Life in Hong Kong: Politics, Gender, and Ritual in the New Territories, James L. Watson and Rubie S. Watson, Hong Kong: Chinese University press, 2004." traditional dwellings and settlements review (Berkeley, United States of America) vol.16 no.2 (Apr 2005), pp. 96-97
    (CUHK Library Call No: ARL Periodical HT51 .T72)



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Cantonese Cuisine in Post-1997 Hong Kong." Paper presented in the 9th Symposium on Chinese Dietary Culture, organized by Foundation of Chinese Dietary Culture, Tainan, 11 Nov 2005



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Consuming "low" cuisine after Hong Kong's handover: Village banquets and private kitchens." asian studies review (Australia: Routledge) vol.29 no.3 (Sep 2005), pp.259-273.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Periodical DS1 .A78; Available Online)



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Consuming 'Low' Cuisine after Hong Kong's Handover: Village Banquets and Private Cuisine." Paper presented in the Sea Corridors to Join Asia and the World: Encounters between Cultures, Symposium Series 1, organized by The Institute of Oriental and Occidental Studies, Kansai University, Japan, 2007.



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Fish in the Marsh: A case study of freshwater fish farming in Hong Kong." Food and Foodways in Asia: Resource, Tradition, and Cooking [London, United Kingdom: Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group)], ed. by Sidney C H Cheung and Tan Chee Beng. pp.37-50. 2007.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reserve GT2853.A78 F66 2007)



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Food and Cuisine in a Changing Society: Hong Kong." The Globalization of Chinese Food ed. by WU, Y.H. David and CHEUNG, C.H. Sidney. pp.100-112. Surrey, UK and Honolulu, USA: Curzon Press and University of Hawaii Press, 2002.03.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL GT2853.C6 G56 2002; UL Reserve GT2853.C6 G56 2002)



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Hakka Restaurants: A Study of the Consumption of Food in Post-war Hong Kong Society." Changing Chinese Foodways in Asia ed. by WU Y.H. David and TAN Chee-beng, pp.81-95. Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press, 2001.09.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reserve GT2853.A8 C492 2001; UL HK Studies GT2853.A8 C492 2001; NA General Education GT285.A8 C492 2001)



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Heritage Preservation and Tourism Development in Hong Kong." Paper presented in the International Conference on Tourism in Asia: New Trends, New Perpectives, organized by Leeds Metropolitan University, United Kingdom, 10 June 2006



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Heritage Preservation and Tourism Development in Hong Kong." Paper presented in the EnviroSeries 2006 Conference on Discovering Green and Heritage Tourism - The Path to Sustainable Tourism, organized by Business Environment Council, Hong Kong, 7 March 2006



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Japanese Fans of Asian Cultures: Hong Kong and Cyber Networks." (co-authored with KAWAGUCHI Mitsuo) (in Japanese) Intriguing Asia (tokyo, Japan) vol.34 (Dec 2001), pp.128-138
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Periodical DS1 .A35)



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Land Use and Fung-Shui: Negotiation in the New Territories, Hong Kong." Cultural Survival Quarterly (USA) vol.25 issue 2 (May 2001), pp.70-71
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Periodical GN380 .N478)



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "The Politics of Wetlandscape in Hong Kong: Migration, Food Production and Development of Local Communities." International Convention of Asia Scholars (ICAS) co-organized by IIAS, AAS and European Science Foundation (ESF) Asia Committee, held in the Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre (KLCC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 2 August 2007



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Preservation and Tourism Development in Hong Kong: An Anthropological Perspective." Tourism, Anthropology and China ed. by Tan Chee Beng, Sidney C.H. Cheung and Yang Hui. pp.257-270. Bangkok: White Lotus Press, 2001.06.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL G155.C5 T68 2001; UL reserve G155.C5 T68 2001)



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Remembering through Space: A Communal Hall in Post-Colonial Hong Kong." Traditional Dwellings and Settlements [Berkeley, USA: IASTE (International Association for the Study of Traditional Environment)] vol.130 (Dec 2000), pp.29-41
    (CUHK Library Call No: ARL Periodical HT51 .T73)



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Remembering through Space: The Politics of Heritage in Hong Kong." International Journal of Heritage Studies (United Kingdom: Routledge/Taylor & Francis) vol.9 no.1 (March 2003), pp.7-26.
    (CUHK Library Call No: ARL Periodical CC135 .I596; Available Online)



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Traditional Dwellings with Rare Plant: Tai Long Wan in Sai Kung, Hong Kong." Contours: Newsletter of the Ecumenical Coalition on Third World Tourism (Hong Kong: Ecumenical Coalition on Third World Tourism) vol.11 no.3 Oct 2001), pp.8-11



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Traditional Dwellings, Conservation and Land Use: A Study of Three Villages in Sai Kung, Hong Kong." Journal of the Hong Kong Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society (Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society) vol.43 (2005), pp.1-14.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Periodical DS1 .R57; Available Online)



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Traditional Settlements and Environmental Change: A Research Plan on Sai Kung, Hong Kong." (co-authored with CHEUNG Frederick and LAU Yee-Cheung) Paper presented in the Conference on Environment & Culture in Urban Contexts: Beijing, Hong Kong and New York. Hong Kong, May 2001



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Visualizing Marriage in Hong Kong." Visual Anthropology (Special Issue on Wedding Photography in East Asia) (U.S.A.: Routledge) vol.19 no.1 (2006), pp.21-37
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Periodical GN347 .V57; Available Online)



  • CHEUNG Chin Hung. "Wetland Tourism in Hong Kong: From birdwatcher to mass ecotourists."Asian Tourism: Growth and Change (London, United Kingdom: Elsevier Sciences B.V.) ed. by Janet Cochrane (2008), pp.259-267
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reserve G155.A74 A85 2008)



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. A Collision of Discourses: Japanese and Hong Kong Chinese during the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands Crisis. Hong Kong: Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1999.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL H62.5.H6 H62 no.94; UL HK Studies H62.5.H6 H62 no.94)



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "A Collision of Discourses: Japanese and Hong Kong Chinese During the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands Crisis". In Globalizing Japan Ethnography of the Japanese Presence in Asia, Europe, and America, ed. by HARUMI Befu and GUICHARD-ANGVIS Slyvie. pp.153-175. London and New York: Routledge, 2001.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL HF1601 .G56 2001; Also Available Online)



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "Comparative Patriotisms: How Hong Kong, Chinese, and American Students Understand "Loving Their Country."" Paper presented in the East Asian Anthropology/Anthropology in East Asia, organized by Society for East Asian Anthropology/Department of Anthropology, CUHK, Hong Kong, 13 July 2006



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. Consuming Hong Kong.(co-edited with Tai-Lok Lui) Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2001.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reserve HC428.H6 C66 2001; UL HK Studies HC428.H6 C66 2001)



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "Cultural Identity and Consumption in Post-Colonial Hong Kong". In Consuming Hong Kong, ed. by Mathews Gordon Clark and Tai-Lok Lui. pp.287-317. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2001
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reserve HC428.H6 C66 2001; UL HK Studies HC428.H6 C66 2001)



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. Global culture/individual identity: searching for home in the cultural supermarket. London; New York: Routledge, 2000.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reserve HM753 .M37 2000; Also Available Online)



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "The Global Parade (including the Japanese) at Chungking Mansions, Hong Kong". Paper presented in the Global Japan Seminars, organized by Europe-Japan Research Centre, Oxford Brookes, U.K., 6 Feb 2008



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. Hong Kong, China: learning to belong to a nation. (co-edited with Eric Kit-wai Ma, and Tai-lok Lui) London; New York: Routledge, 2008.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL HK Studies DS796.H757 M344 2008; CC Reserve DS796.H757 M344 2008)



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "Hong Kong Chinese Professors within the "Western" University Model". Paper presented in the American Anthropological Association 105th Annual Meeting, organized by American Anthropological Association, San Jose, California, 15 Nov 2006



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "Hong Kong's Resistance to National Identity: Echo of a Colonial Past or Harbinger of a Globalized Future". Paper presented in the Second International Conference on New Directions in the Humanities, organized by Monash University, Prato, Italy, July 2004



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "How Hong Kong People are Learning to Be Chinese: Mass Media and National Belonging since 1 July 1997". Paper presented in the Media Technology, Creative Industries, and Culture Significance, organized by Communication Arts Research Institute, Taipei, Taiwan, 22 Sep 2004



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "Images of Japan in Hong Kong after July 1/ July 2, 1997". Paper presented in the Regional Conference on Japanese Studies in East and Sathe "Discourses on Japan after the East Asian Economic Crisis", organized by The Center for Japanese Studies, University of Indonesia. Jakarta, Indonesia, July 2001



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "Learning to Belong to a Nation in Hong Kong". Anthropology News. Vol. 44 No.3, pp. 41-42. Related Research Project Title: "On Learning to Belong to a Nation: A Comparison of Hong Kong, Chinese, and American Senses of National Identity." Project Reference: Direct Grant. Arlington, Virginia, USA: American Anthropological Association, East Asia Section, March 2003
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Periodical GN2 .A227)



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "Learning to Belong to a Nation: The Continuing Exception of Hong Kong". Paper presented in the International Symposium on National Identity and the Future Cross-Strait Relations, organized by University of Macau, Macau, 16 Dec 2004



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "On Learning (Fitfully) to Love One's Country: Hong Kong and the Global Meanings of National Identity". Paper presented in the Ethnography and Social Theory Colloquium, organized by Yale University, Department of Anthropology, Yale University, Department of Anthropology, 7 Feb 2005



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "On Learning to Belong to a Nation: Hong Kong People and Chineseness Today." Paper presented in Fourth Annual Meeting of the Hong Kong Sociological Association, "Representing Social Life: Conflicts and Identities, Hong Kong Baptist University: Hong Kong Sociological Association, 9 Nov 2002



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "State and Market in the Shaping of Cultural Identity: Hong Kong and Elsewhere". Paper presented in the 98th Annual Meeting of American Sociological Association, organized by American Sociological Association, Atlanta, U.S.A., 17 Aug 2003



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "State and Market in the Shaping of Cultural Identity: The Extraordinary Exception of Hong Kong". Paper presented in the Department of Sociology Seminar, Hong Kong Baptist University, organized by Department of Sociology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, 11 Dec 2003



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "State and Market in the Shaping of National Identity: The Strange Exception of Hong Kong". Paper presented in the Invited Lecture at Singapore Management University, organized by Singapore Management University, Singapore, 30 March 2004



  • Gordon Clark MATHEWS. "The Struggle Between 'Japanese' and 'Non-Japanese' Among Japanese in Hong Kong". (co-authored with Sone Ayako) Paper presented in the 10th International Conference of the European Association for Japanese Studies, organized by European Association for Japanese Studies, Warsaw, Poland, 28 Aug 2003



  • LU Lie Dan. "Cultural Dynamics in Prehistoric Hong Kong ". Society of East Asian Anthropology Hong Kong, CUHK, 2006.07.15.



  • LU Lie Dan. "Heritage Preservation in Post-Colonial Hong Kong". Paper presented in the Heritage and the Environment Conference, organized by Glasgow Caledonian University. Isle of Skye, United Kingdom, 2007.06.23.



  • LU Lie Dan. "The Management of Cultural Heritage in Hong Kong". The Chinese University of Hong Kong Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies Occasional Paper No. 137. Hong Kong, China: the Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2003.



  • LU Lie Dan. The Origin and Development of Neolithic Culture in Hong Kong. 論文發表於Heritage Conservation and Prehistoric Archaeology of South China, 主辦機構為AMO and Anthropology Dept. CUHK. ChinaHong Kong, 2007.12.14.



  • LU Lie Dan. "Preserving Cultural Heritage in Hong Kong". Paper presented in the International Conference on Social Science. Hawaii, University of Hawaii, 2003.



  • MINTZ W. Sidney. "Bean-Curd Consumption in Hong Kong" (co-authored with TAN Chee Beng). Ethnology vol.40 no.2, Pittsburgh, USA, 2001. pp.113-128.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Being Female and Ethnic Minority in Hong Kong: The Double Marginalization of Nepalese Women and Its Policy Implications". Paper presented in the International Conference on "Women’s Policy in China and Korea: Thinking from Women’s Lives" organized by Keimyung University. Daegu, Korea, 2007.05.24.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Being Female and Ethnic Minority: Gender and Social Capital Among the Nepalese in Postcolonial Hong Kong". First Global Conference: Multiculturalism, Conflict and Belonging Oxford, U.K.: Mansfield College, 2007.09.03.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Being Minority in Hong Kong: The Case of Nepalese Women and Its Implications for the New Race Discrimination Bill". Paper presented in the Sociological Seminar, No. 75 organized by Department of Sociology, Nanjing University. Nanjing, China, 2007.06.12.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Belonging in Displacement: Minnan Women Constructing Identities". Paper presented at the 2nd International Conference on Hong Kong Culture "Local and Global: Identity and Differences", organized by Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Hong Kong, 2000.10.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. A bibliography of gender studies in Hong Kong, 1991-1997. (co-authored with Fanny M. Cheung and Serena Sheng-hua Chu) Hong Kong : Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1998.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reference Z7964.H6 B52 1998 c.2; UL HK Studies Z7964.H6 B52 1998 c.3; CC Reference Z7964.H6 B52 1998 c.4; NA Reference Z7964.H6 B52 1998)



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Comments (on the Female Inheritance Movement in Hong Kong: Theorizing the Local/Global Interface)". Current Anthropology vol.46 no.3,. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.06. pp.403-404.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Periodical GN1 .C8 v.46, no.1-3, 2005)



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Constructing Patriarchal Equality: Women in the Medical and Engineering Professions in Hong Kong". Paper presented at the International Congress of Asian and North African Studies. Montreal, Canada, 2000.08.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Constructing Wives and Mistresses: Polygyny Across the Hong Kong- China Border". Paper presented at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Asian Studies, organized by Association for Asian Studies. Chicago, 2001.03.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Convenient-Involvement Foods and Production of the Family Meal in Hong Kong". Production of Food and Foodways in Asia Department of Anthropology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, and Hong Kong Heritage Museum Hong Kong, 2004.03.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Country Institutional Report: Hong Kong SAR". Women’s/Gender Studies n Asia-Pacific ed. by Philip Bergstrom. Bangkok: UNESCO Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education, 2004. pp.244-266.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. Culture and society of Hong Kong : a bibliography. (co-authored with Sidney C.H. Cheung) Hong Kong: Dept. of Anthropology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1999.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL DS796.H75 C85 1999 c.5; UL Reference DS796.H75 C85 1999; UL HK Studies DS796.H75 C85 1999 c.4; ARL Reference DS796.H75 C85 1999 c.3; CC Reference DS796.H75 C85 1999 c.2; NA General Education DS796.H75 C85 1999 c.6; NA Reference DS796.H75 C85 1999 c.8)



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "The Double Marginalization of Nepalese Women in Hong Kong and its Policy Implications.". Women’s Policy in China and Korea: Thinking from Women’s Lives ed. by Institute for Women’s Studies, Keimyung University. Daegu, Korea, South: Keimyung University Press, 2007. pp.253-281.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Double Marginalization: The Experience of Nepalese Women in Hong Kong". Faculty Seminar Nursing Department, CUHK, 2007.04.11.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Eating Metropolitaneity: Hong Kong Identity in Yumcha. ". The International Library of Social Change in Asia Pacific - Hong Kong. ed. by Benjamin KP Leung. United Kingdom: Ashgate, 2004. pp.459-468.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. “Engendering Chinese Men: A Cultural Analysis of Hong Kong Men's Mistress-keeping in Mainland China”. (co-authored with LIONG Chan Ching Mario)Women’s Worlds 2005 -- the 9th International Interdisciplinary Congress on Women . Seoul, Korea: Ewha Women’s University, 2005.06. p.1-13



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "The Female Face of Being Minority: Nepalese Women in Hong Kong". Paper presented in the SASON International Conference "Social Sciences in a Multicultural World: Addressing the Persistence of Deprivation, Conflict and Violence" 10 pgs. Kathmandu, Nepal, 2006.12.11.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Forced Mobility, Parental Power and Marriage Constraints: Femininities Among Nepalese Women in Hong Kong". Paper presented in the The 5th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, 12 pgs. Honolulu, 2007.01.12.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Forces of Tradition, Forces of Change: University Women in Gender Studies in Hong Kong". Paper presented in the International Conference on the Indigenization of Women's Studies Teaching: Asian Experiences. Beijing, 2002.10.19.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. Gender differences in the career development of professionals in Hong Kong. (co-authored with Mandy M. Hoi and Fanny M. Cheung) Hong Kong : Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies, 2004.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL H62.5.H6 H62 no.152 c.2; UL HK Studies H62.5.H6 H62 no.152)



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Gender Studies in Hong Kong's Tertiary Education Sector and the Practice of Gender Equality". Round Table on Current Issues of Women’s Studies in Asia Seoul: Korean Women’s Institute, 2007.11.15.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Gendered Subjectivities: Minnan Women in Hong Kong and the Philippines". Paper presented in the 2nd International Congress of Asian Scholars. Berlin, 2001.08.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. Globalizing local identity : Hong Kong style yumcha in Australia. Hong Kong : Chinese University Of Hong Kong, 1997.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL GT2853.A8 T35 1997)



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Heunggongyan Forever: Immigrant Life and Hong Kong Style Yumcha in Australia". The Globalization of Chinese Food ed. by WU Y.H., David and CHEUNG C.H., Sidney. pp.131-151. Curzon, 2002.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL GT2853.C6 G56 2002; UL Reserve 2 hours GT2853.C6 G56 2002 c.2)



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. Hong Kong : the anthropology of a Chinese metropolis. (co-authored with Grant Evans ) Hong Kong : Chinese University Of Hong Kong, 1997.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reserve 2 hours DS796.H75 H63 1997 c.3; UL Reserve 4 hours DS796.H75 H63 1997; UL HK Studies DS796.H75 H63 1997 c.2)



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Lost, and Found?: Reconstructing Hong Kong Identity in the Idiosyncrasy and Syncretism of Yumcha". Changing Chinese Foodways in Asia ed. by David Wu and Tan Chee Beng. Hong Kong: Chinese University Press, 2001. pp.49-69.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reserve 4 hours GT2853.A8 C492 2001; UL HK Studies GT2853.A8 C492 2001 c.3; NA General Education GT2853.A8 C492 2001 c.2)



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "New Patriarchs: Hong Kong Men Keeping Mistresses in Mainland China". International Conference on "Globalization and Gender: The Implications of Global Economic Restructuring for Women in China and Southeast Asia," organized by Gender Research Centre, the Chinese University of Hong Kong and Women's Studies Centre, Peking University, Hong Kong, 2003.11.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Patriarchal Mobility: Minnan Immigrant Women in Hong Kong". Paper presented in the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences Inter-Congress on Metropolitan Ethnic. Beijing, Canada, 2000.07.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. Private practice and gendered power : women doctors in Hong Kong. Hong Kong: Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1999.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL H62.5.H6 H62 no.99; UL HK Studies H62.5.H6 H62 no.99 c.2; MD H62.5.H6 H62 no.99 c.3)



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Revisiting Polygyny: Views of Mainland and Hong Kong Chinese Women Compared". Paper presented in International Symposium on Female Anthropology Lijiang, Yunnan, China, 2003.03.09.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. The structuration of Chinese modernization : women workers of Shekou industrial zone. Ann Arbor, Mich. : UMI, 1994.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL HD6200.Z6 S5 1994)



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "Survival and Sacrifice: Minnan Women in Hong Kong". Paper presented at the International Conference on Migration and the "Asian Family" in a Globalizing World, organized by Asian Metacentre for Population and Sustainable Development Analysis, Singapore, 2001.04.



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. Tung Chung Before and After the New Airport: An Ethnographic Study of a Community in Hong Kong. (co-authored with YIP Hon Ming) Hong Kong: Antiquities and Monuments Office, HKSAR, 2005.12.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL HK Studies DS796.H76 T65 2005)



  • TAM Siu Mi Maria. "We-women and They-women: Imagining Mistresses Across the Hong Kong-China Border". Reghinking and Recasting Citizenship: Social Exclusion and Marginality in Chinese Societies ed. by May Tam, Hok Bun Ku, Travis Kong. Hong Kong: Center for Social Policy Studies, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 2005.04. p.107-130.



  • TAN Chee Beng. Changing Chinese foodways in Asia (co-authored with David Y.H. Wu). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press, 2001.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reserve 4 hours GT2853.A8 C492 2001; UL HK Studies GT2853.A8 C492 2001 c.3; NA General Education GT2853.A8 C492 2001 c.2)



  • TAN Chee Beng. "Teaching and Documentation of Chinese Overseas Studies with Special Reference to The Chinese University of Hong Kong"(co-authored with CHIU Shu Ju Ann). Paper presented in the Second International Conference of Institutes & Libraries for Chinese Overseas Studies. Hong Kong SAR, 2003.03.



  • 陳志明:《福建曁閩南硏究文獻選輯》(與張小軍合編),香港:香港中文大學香港亞太硏究所,1999。
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reference Z3107.F84 F8 1999 c.2; UL HK Studies Z3107.F84 F8 1999 c.3; CC Reference Z3107.F84 F8 1999 c.4; NA Reference Z3107.F84 F8 1999)



  • 張展鴻:〈淺談香港新界后海灣淡水魚養殖業的歷史及其社區發展〉,見《HKIAPS Occasional Paper》 第160卷 (2005年10月),頁20。



  • 張展鴻:《漁翁移山 : 香港本土漁業民俗誌》,香港:上書局出版社,2009。



  • 譚少薇:《分隔家庭對性別關係的衝擊》,香港:香港中文大學香港亞太研究所,2004。
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL H62.5.H6 H62 no.151 c.2; UL HK Studies H62.5.H6 H62 no.151)



  • 譚少薇:《沙田婦女參與社區事務硏究報告》,香港:沙田區議會社區發展委員會,1993。
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL HK Studies HQ1781.Z8S43 1993)



  • 譚少薇:《性別與傳媒》,香港:香港中文大學香港亞太硏究所性別硏究計劃,1996。
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL P96.S48 L53 1996; UL HK Studies P96.S48 L53 1996 c.3; CC P96.S48 L53 1996 c.2)



  • 譚少薇:《性別觀察》,香港:麥穗出版有限公司,2003。
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Reserve 2 hours HQ1075 .X54 2003)



  • 譚少薇:《香港的跨境「包二奶」現象與社會福利界的回應》(與馬麗莊合著),香港:香港亞太研究所,2007。
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL H62.5.H6 H62 no.182 c.2; UL HK Studies H62.5.H6 H62 no.182)



  • 譚少薇:<香港高校的性別研究課程與性別平等實踐>,《全國婦聯兩岸四地會議》,北京,2006.09.19,頁24。



  • 譚少薇:<港式飲茶與香港人的身份認同>,《廣西民族學院學報》(哲學社會科學版) 第23卷第期,中國南寧:廣西民族學院, 2001.07,頁29-32。
    (CUHK Library Call No: Available Online)



  • 譚少薇:《選舉行為與意識的性別差異 : 以沙田區靑少年為例》(與黎安國及馬淑儀合著),香港:香港中文大學香港亞太硏究所,1996。
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL H62.5.H6 H62 no.49; UL HK Studies H62.5.H6 H62 no.49 c.3)


* Name of external researcher
# Name of staff who has left the University