LU Lie Dan Tracey 呂烈丹

Research Projects


  • Documentation of Archaeological Artefacts Discovered in Hong Kong
  • LU Lie Dan
    28 July 2007
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, HKSAR Government

    Archaeological excavations have been carried out in Hong Kong for many years, and a large quantity of artefacts has been accumulated. It would benefit both the public and the academic world if these data can be systematically documented to facilitate further research and education activities. Hence a project on documenting archaeological data is proposed. The primary objective of this project is to register and document archaeological data discovered in recent years in Hong Kong. Student of anthropology department will participate in the documentation process, thus the project will also be a valuable training opportunity for students who have some basic archaeological knowledge. The project will be carried based on the documentation standard set up by AMO. Each artefact will be registered, classified, verbally described and visually recorded. The information will be inputted into a digital system. (AL07687)


  • Documentation of Archaeological Discoveries in Hong Kong
  • LU Lie Dan
    20 July 2004
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, Leisure & Cultural Services Department, HKSAR Government

    Archaeological excavations have been carried out in Hong Kong for many years, and a large quantity of artifacts has been accumulated. However, many of these artifacts have not been properly recorded and classified. This project aims to systematically document the archaeological discoveries made in Hong Kong in order to facilitate further research and education activities. (SS04355)


  • Documentation of Archaeological Discoveries in Hong Kong
  • LU Lie Dan
    14 November 2005
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, Leisure & Cultural Services Department, HKSAR Government

    Archaeological excavations have been carried out in Hong Kong for many years, and a large quantity of artefacts has been accumulated. It would benefit both the public and the academic world if these data can be systematically documented to facilitate further research and education activities. The primary objective of this project is to register and document archaeological data discovered in recent years in Hong Kong. Meanwhile, some students of anthropology department will participate in the documentation process. Thus the project will also be a valuable training opportunity for students who have some basic archaeological knowledge. (SS05743)


  • A Multi-disciplinary Study of the Cheung Shue Tan Archaeological Data
  • LU Lie Dan
    30 November 2006
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, HKSAR Government

    Archaeological data have been found at Cheung Shue Tan, Tai Po, at a river site location. These data may represent another type of prehistoric and historic human settlement in Hong Kong. Rescue excavation is being carried out from Nov. 2006 to April 2007. In order to retrieve as much information as possible about the past nature and cultural development in Hong Kong, it is proposed to use various research approaches, including residue analysis, neutron activation analysis, floatation, phytolith and pollen analysis to study the ancient environment and human cultures at Cheung Shue Tan, to provide new information for our understanding of the diversity of prehistoric and historic cultures in Hong Kong. (SS06979)


  • The Origin and Cultural Development of Hong Kong's Earliest Identifiable Inhabitants
  • LU Lie Dan, YUAN Jiarong*, FU Xianguo*
    1 January 2005
    Research Grants Council (Earmarked Grants)

    Archaeological remains illustrate that the earliest identifiable Neolithic occupation of Hong Kong can be dated to approximately 6000 years ago. This project will investigate from where and how these people came to Hong Kong. The project aims to identify the ‘homeland’ (distant or local), the route(s) of movement (if any), and any stimuli for such movements. Thus, we intend to examine the relationships between Neolithic cultures in Hong Kong and those in adjacent areas, to as far away as the Yangzi Basin. The project will also investigate cultural developments after the first Neolithic settlement, and the ensuing formation of localized archaeological cultures. This project will provide foundational data for the beginning of human history in Hong Kong. It will reveal patterns and processes within one of the major episodes of population movement and cultural development in the prehistoric world, this being the development and expansion of agriculture societies, and the effects and consequences of such expansions on prehistoric cultures. In addition, the project will illustrate how prehistoric humans were able to innovate new lifestyles in different environments. (CU04101)


  • The Prehistoric Subsistence Strategies at Sha Ha, Hong Kong
  • LU Lie Dan, ZHAO Zhijun*
    1 November 2001
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, HKSAR Government

    Archaeological data suggest that the human history in Hong Kong can be traced back to at least 6000 years ago. However, the subsistence strategies of prehistoric Hong Kong are still not clear. Were the prehistoric Hong Kong resident hunters and fishers, or were they farmers? When agriculture was introduced into Hong Kong, and by whom? All these are crucial questions for us to understand the Hong Kong prehistory. This project aims to investigate these issues by conducting phytolith and pollen analyses on samples gathered from Sha Ha, an archaeological site going to be excavated from Feb. to April 2002 in Hong Kong. If there are animal and/or shell remains found, these remains will also be analyzed. The objectives of this project are to use multi-disciplinary approaches to investigate the natural resources available to prehistoric Hong Kong residents, and patterns of human adaptation in the forms of subsistence strategies. The outcome will provide essential data for the reconstruction of the prehistory of Hong Kong, and references for studies on the prehistory in adjacent South China and Southeast Asia. (SS01501)


  • Provision of Optically Stimulated Luminesence (OSL) Dating Services for Wong Tei Tung Archaeological Site
  • LU Lie Dan
    16 May 2006
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, Leisure & Cultural Services Department, HKSAR Governmen

    Stone implements were discovered at Wong Tei Tung in Sham Chung, Sai Kung between 2004 and 2006, and have been preliminarily dated to over 35,000 years ago (AMO 2006). If this date is valid, the Wong Tei Tung remains will be the earliest archaeological data found in Hong Kong. However, there are different opinions on this issue. Thus, further studies will be carried out in order to validate the above dating result. Geological analysis will be used to investigate whether the Wong Tei Tung deposits are in their original position or they had been disturbed; Optically Stimulated Luminescence dating will be used to test whether die date of 35,000 years is valid; and typological analysis will be utilized to examine whether die stone tools represent .Palaeolithic stone industry. in terms of manufacturing skills and typological characteristics. The result of this project will provide new data for better understanding prehistoric archaeology of Hong Kong. (SS05588)


  • Recording Wan Chai People’s Culture
  • LU Lie Dan, TAM Siu Mi Maria
    7 February 2006
    The Conservancy Association Centre for Heritage

    Wan Chai is one of the oldest districts in Hong Kong. As it is being redeveloped by the government, many traditional items and properties are rapidly disappearing. In order to preserve some tangible and intangible cultural properties in Wan Chai, we are going to record household items of an old flat in Wan Chai, which has not been renovated since the 1950s. The objectives of this project are 1) to accurately record and describe individual and assembled items in this flat, and to conduct interview with local peoples to collect data about Wan Chai people.s way of life; 2) based on the above data and other published documents, to analyze the meanings and functions of the items. The outcome of this project will be a documentation of the floor plan and household items of the flat. During this documentation process, the flat will be opened to the public to encourage public participation in heritage preservation in order to enhance Wan Chai peoples. sense of belonging and group identity. The outcome of this project will also provide valuable information for the public history of Wan Chai and Hong Kong. (AL05684)


  • Research on Archaeological Assemblages Discovered from So Kwun Wat Rescue Excavation
  • LU Lie Dan
    28 May 2006
    Antiquities & Monuments Office, Leisure & Cultural Services Department, HKSAR Government

    So Kwun Wat is an important archaeological assemblage in Hong Kong, containing data from the late Neolithic to the historical period. In order to retrieve as much as possible information to facilitate a better understanding of Hong Kong archaeology, it is proposed to use various methods to examine the composition of pottery, to investigate the manufacturing skills and functions of the stone implements, as well as to study the textile remains found in So Kwun Wat. The result of this project will provide new data for our understanding of cultural contacts within and outside ancient Hong Kong, as well as the material cultures and life of ancient Hong Kong inhabitants. (SS05776)


  • The Subsistence Strategies in South China and Hong Kong between 10,000 and 4000 Years Ago
  • LU Lie Dan, FU Xian Guo*
    10 July 2002
    Research Grants Council (Earmarked Grants)

    South China and Hong Kong are important areas with respect to the development and spread of early agricultural societies in East and Southeast Asia. To date, the prehistory of these regions during the relevant time span for these developments, between 10,000 and 4000 years ago, is still only poorly understood. This project aims to investigate the significant economic change form hunting and gathering to agriculture in southern China and Hong Kong, and the causes of, and processes behind this change.
    Be conducting archaeological survey and excavations and scientific analyses on archaeological data, this project will first investigate the natural resources and human exploitation of these resources before the development of agriculture in this region. It will then examine whether rice agriculture developed locally, or was introduced from the Yangzi Valley, and expanded further to Southeast Asia and the Pacific. The project will also investigate whether prehistoric people in southern China were reacting to environmental variation through modification of their subsistence strategies during the transition to agriculture at about 5000 years ago. The outcome will provide essential data for an important chapter of local prehistory, and on past relationships between human, culture and their environments. It will also provide vital information for the origin and diaspora of the Austronesian, which is an important issue on Asian and world archaeology. (CU02196)



Research Publications


  • "Cultural Dynamics in Prehistoric Hong Kong ". Society of East Asian Anthropology Hong Kong, CUHK, 2006.07.15.



  • "Heritage Preservation in Post-Colonial Hong Kong". Paper presented in the Heritage and the Environment Conference, organized by Glasgow Caledonian University. Isle of Skye, United Kingdom, 2007.06.23.



  • "The Management of Cultural Heritage in Hong Kong". The Chinese University of Hong Kong Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies Occasional Paper No. 137. Hong Kong, China: the Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2003.



  • The Origin and Development of Neolithic Culture in Hong Kong. 論文發表於Heritage Conservation and Prehistoric Archaeology of South China, 主辦機構為AMO and Anthropology Dept. CUHK. ChinaHong Kong, 2007.12.14.



  • "Preserving Cultural Heritage in Hong Kong". Paper presented in the International Conference on Social Science. Hawaii, University of Hawaii, 2003.


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# Name of staff who has left the University