LEE Paul Siu Nam 李少南

Research Projects


  • Assessing the Role of Foreign Television in Hong Kong: Local Culture and Global Identity
  • LEE Paul Siu Nam
    31 December 2000
    Research Grants Council (Earmarked Grants)

    This study examines the impact of foreign TV on Hong Kong. HK audience can receive up to 45 domestic and foreign TV channels, including 4 terrestrial channels, 37 pay channels, and a variety of free-to-air satellite channels. A video- on-demand service was introduced in 1998. People can have access to many foreign channels, e.g., CNNI, HBO, ESPN, Channel [V], Australia TV, DW, TV5 Asia, RAI, etc. However, most people prefer local programs on the free-to-air Chinese channels of TVB-Jade & ATV-Home. Although regional productions from Taiwan & China occasionally make the free-to-air TV screen during prime time, local productions of TVB-Jade channel consistently command 70% of rating while those of ATV have about 30%. The study focuses on the question whether HK people's cultural values & identity are adversely affected by foreign programs. The findings will throw light on the issues of cultural imperialism, global culture & global identity. It will also help policymakers to make informed choices regulating foreign TV. (CU00344)


  • Changing Patterns of New Media Consumption in the Information Age: A Study on Adoption, Use and Impact on Life Quality in Hong Kong Families
  • LEUNG Wing Chi Louis, LEE Paul Siu Nam
    31 December 2001
    Research Grants Council (Earmarked Grants)

    This study examines the role that new communication technologies play on quality of life. Changes in the structure of modern Hong Kong families have created new needs for new media services. Recent socio-political, cultural, and technological changes in Hong Kong are significantly changing the way people work and play, the amount of time people have to engage in family-oriented communication, social interaction, leisure activities, use of media, community participation, and subsequently, the perceived quality of life. However, many communication needs are not being met by existing media services. At the same time, the phenomenal growth of new media such as the Internet, cable TV, interactive TV, and mobile phone is changing fundamentally the way in which infotainment products and services are designed, delivered, and consumed. Through quantitative and qualitative methods, this research focuses on the relationships between changing communication needs and people.s use of new media products and services, the impact of such use on social relationships and perceived life quality. Findings will suggest new directions for a customer-centered rather than a technology-centered approach in product development for the new media market. (AL01315)


  • A Comparative Study of News Coverage of Japan and China in Tokyo, Shanghai and Hong Kong
  • LEE Paul Siu Nam
    1 June 2005
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    This study is part of a collaborative research on the images of Japan and China held by people conducted respectively in Tokyo, Shanghai and Hong Kong. This study has three main objectives: 1) To examine the images of Japan and China covered in the television news of Tokyo. Shanghai and Hong Kong: 2) To examine the sources and reasons for the images; 3) To help television journalists to be more culturally sensitive to portrayal of stereotypes in news reporting. This study uses three methods to accomplish the tasks. First, a content analysis of a probability sample of 100 television newscasts is used to obtain television’s portrayal Chinese and Japanese people in Hong Kong. Second, a telephone survey of a probability sample of 500 people is conducted to examine the images of Japan and China held by Hong Kong people. Third, focus group studies are used to uncover the meanings of those stereotypical images held in Hong Kong. The findings of this study will draw the attention of Chinese and Japanese people to the images they hold of each other and help them to be critical in accepting and transmitting those images. For media practitioners, the findings will help to increase their cultural sensitivity in creating and transmitting the images as well. The significance of this study lies in raising both Chinese and Japanese people’s cultural sensitivity, including that of media practitioners’. (SS04370)


  • ‘CUHK’ Hong Kong Quality of Life Index - Socio-Cultural Sub-Index
  • SHEK Tan Lei Daniel, LEE Paul Siu Nam (School of Journalism and Communication)
    1 May 2006
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    The CUHK Hong Kong Quality of Life Index, which aims to assess and monitor the quality of life in Hong Kong, is a composite index incorporating both objective and subjective measure. This index, developed by the Faculty of Social Science of The Chinese University of Hong Kong, employs data collected in representative sample surveys and official statistics. A wide range of life domains is covered and the year 2002 is taken as the base year of the study. Index scores demonstrate that in general the quality of life in Hong Kong has improved slightly in 2003 and more markedly in 2004. Scores of the composite index and the three sub-indices on sectorial performance are somewhat higher than those of the previous years. It is noteworthy that Hong Kong has made noticeable progress and performs as well as many economically advanced societies in certain life domains. Yet, the well-being of the people relies on further improvement in others. As part of the CUHK Hong Kong Quality of Life Index, the Socio-Cultural Sub-index consists of indicators measuring different aspects of people.s daily life, including mortality rate, life expectancy at birth, public expenditure on health as a proportion of the GDP, notification rate of notifiable infectious disease, stress index, general life satisfaction index, press freedom index, press criticism index, government performance index and overall crime rate. (SS05996)


  • ‘CUHK’ Hong Kong Quality of Life Index – Socio-Cultural Sub-Index
  • SHEK Tan Lei Daniel, LEE Paul Siu Nam (School of Journalism and Communication)
    1 May 2007
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    The CUHK Hong Kong Quality of Life Index, which aims to assess and monitor the quality of life in Hong Kong, is a composite index incorporating both objective and subjective measure. This index, developed by the Faculty of Social Science of The Chinese University of Hong Kong, employs data collected in representative sample surveys and official statistics. A wide range of life domains is covered and the year 2002 is taken as the base year to the study. Index scores demonstrate that in general the quality of life in Hong Kong has improved slightly in 2003 and more markedly in 2004. Scores of the composite index and the three sub-indices on sectorial performance are somewhat higher than those of the previous years. It is noteworthy that Hong Kong has made noticeable progress and performs as well as many economically advanced societies in certain life domains. Yet, the well-being of the people relies on further improvement in others. As part of the CUHK Hong Kong Quality of Life Index, the Economic Sub-index consists of indicators measuring the economic conditions of Hong Kong, including housing affordability ratio, rental index, unemployment rate, index of current economic conditions, real wage index, public expenditure on education as a proportion of the GDP and age participation rate for first-degree programmes and postgraduate programmes in local universities. (SS06828)


  • ‘CUHK’ Hong Kong Quality of Life Index – Socio-Cultural Sub-Index
  • SHEK Tan Lei Daniel, LEE Paul Siu Nam (School of Journalism and Communication), MAK Wing Sze Winnie (Psychology), TING Kwok Fai (Sociology), MA Ngok (Government & Public Administration)
    1 May 2008
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    The CUHK Hong Kong Quality of Life Index, which aims to assess and monitor the quality of life in Hong Kong, is a composite index incorporating both objective and subjective measure. This index, developed by the Faculty of Social Science of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, employs data collected in representative sample survey and official statistics. A wide range of life domains is covered and the year 2002 is taken as the base year of study. Index scores over the last four years demonstrate that in general the quality of life in Hong Kong has improved continuously since 2003. Generally, scores of the composite index and the three sub-indices on sectorial performance are somewhat higher than those of the previous years. It is noteworthy that Hong Kong has made noticeable progress and performs as well as many economically advanced societies in certain life domains. Yet, the well-begin of the people relies on further improvement in others.
    As part of the CUHK Hong Kong Quality of Life Index, The socio-cultural sub-index consists of indicators relating to different disciplines of study. For example, mortality rate and notification rate of notifiable infectious disease measure the aspect of physical health. Stress index and general life satisfaction measure psychological well-being of Hong Kong people. Press freedom and press criticism indices reflect the cultural and media aspects of Hong Kong society. As for government performance index and overall crime rate, they reveal the political and judicial aspects in Hong Kong. (SS07863)



Research Publications


  • "The communication research and education in Hong Kong". (co-authored with LEUNG Wai Yin Kenneth and CHU Leonard L) Global trends in communication research and education ed. by K.Leung, J.Kenny & P. Lee. Cresskill, United States of America: Hampton Press, 2006.



  • "A comparative study exploring the impact of Internet activities, use of new media, and leisure activities on quality of life in Beijing, Taipei and Hong Kong". (co-authored with LEUNG Wing Chi Louis; LO V and XIONG C) Paper presented in the 14th AMIC Annual Conference Asian Media Information and Communication Centre (AMIC) - Media and Society in Asia: Transformations and Transitions. China, Beijing, 2005.07.18.



  • "Democracy, the press and civil society in Hong Kong.". (co-authored with LEUNG Wing Chi Louis) Paper presented in the 2004 Conference of International Association of Mass Communication Research, organized by Porto Alegre. Brazil, 2004.07.



  • "The Displacement Effects of the Internet on the News Media - A Case Study of Hong Kong". (co-authored with LEUNG Wing Chi Louis) Paper presented in the Journalism Education Association Annual Conference, Sydney, Australia, 2003.11.



  • "e-Government as Image-Engineering: A Comparative Study of e-Government Portals of the United States, China, and Hong Kong" (co-authored with LAI R). Paper presented in the International Association of Media & Communication Research (IAMCR), Paris, France. 2007.07.23.



  • "Hong Kong Media Coverage of U.S. Iraqi Policy, 2003-2005". Paper presented in the International Association of Media & Communication Research (IAMCR). Taiwan, Taipei, 2005.07.26.



  • "Hong Kong Television: An Anchor for Local Identity". Contemporary Television: Eastern Perspectives ed. by FRENCH David and RICHARDS Michael. pp.363-383. London, UK: London: Sage, 2000.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL HE8700.9.A78 C66 1996)



  • "The Impact of New Communication Technologies on Local Culture: A Case of Hong Kong". Communication Frontiers in the New Millennium Hong Kong: The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2000.07. p.24.



  • "An interlude in globalization - The world's responses to China and Hong Kong's SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome).". Paper presented in the International Conference on Epidemics and Transborder Violence, organized by Hong Kong Baptist University. Hong Kong, 2004.12.



  • "No News is Good News - The Media Images of Asia in Hong Kong". Paper presented in the Media Research Conference, organized by I.A.M.C.R. Singapore, 2000.07.



  • "The professional education of advertising in Hong Kong: A case of dependency or adaptation?" (co-authored with LEUNG Wai Yin Kenneth). Paper presented in the International Association of Media & Communication Research (IAMCR). Taiwan, Taipei, 2005.07.26.



  • "Stereotypes and News Media: `Australia' in Hong Kong". Australian Journalism Review vol.22 no.2, pp.34-47. 2000.



  • "The Stereotypes of Japan and South Korea among Hong Kong People". Outer imit: A Reader in Behaviour and Communication across Cultures ed. by J. Leigh & E. Loo. pp.237-249. Sydney: Language Australia Ltd., 2004.



  • "Television, Identity and Civil Society - The Role of a Non-controversial Public Space in Hong Kong". Television, Regulation and Civil Society in Asia ed. by Philip Kitley. London, United Kingdom: RoutledgeCurzon, 2003. pp.188-204.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL PN1992.3.A78 T45 2003; Available Online)



  • "What are e-governments doing? Comparing the IT-related department of the U.S., China and Hong Kong in the cyberspace" (co-authored with LAI R). Paper presented in the International Association of Media & Communication Research (IAMCR). Taiwan, Taipei, 2005.07.26.



  • "The Youth’s Media Use in the Internet Age: A Case of Hong Kong". (co-authored with LEUNG Wing Chi Louis) Paper presented in the Youth’s Use of Media in Chinese Societies, organised by the Chinese Communication Society, Taiwan. Hong Hong Baptist University, 2001.07.



  • 《名利雙贏 : 企業傳訊如何打造品牌》(與李永安及尹惠玲合編),香港:匯智出版有限公司,2006。
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL HD59.2 .M55 2006; UL HK Studies HD59.2 .M55 2006 c.2)



  • 《香港傳媒新世紀》,香港:中文大學出版社,2003。
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL P92.H6 X53 2003 c.4; UL Reserve 6 hours P92.H6 X53 2003; UL HK Studies P92.H6 X53 2003 c.3)



  • 《香港傳播硏究》(與梁偉賢合編),香港:香港中文大學新聞與傳播學系,1994。
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL P92.H6 L5 1993; UL HK Studies P92.H6 L5 1993 c.2)



  • 《媒介縱橫》,香港:次文化有限公司,1993。
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL P92.H6 L5 1993; UL HK Studies P92.H6 L5 1993 c.2)


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