MAK Wing Sze Winnie 麥穎思

Research Projects


  • Application of Self-Determination Theory to Smoking Reduction
  • MAK Wing Sze Winnie, YEUNG Chun Yiu*
    15 December 2007
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    Smoking has long been identified as the most prominent cause of preventable deaths. In view of detrimental effects of smoking, exploring factors facilitating smoking reduction is therefore important for community health. The proposed research aims to apply Self-Determination Theory (SDT) to smoking reduction among Hong Kong smokers. SDT values the role of self-determination in maintenance of people’s behavior. It is conceptualized from three basic psychological needs of humans, namely need for autonomy, need for competence, and need for relatedness. It proposes that people’s engagement in a particular health behavior is influenced by their level of autonomy in their health motivations, their perceived competence of performing the behavior and the support for their autonomy in their health decisions.
    The study has several theoretical extensions, which concern the nature of autonomous motivations, the effect of individual characteristics on the nature of autonomous motivations, and the unique contribution of situation-specific self-efficacy to SDT research on smoking.
    The research is a 1-month follow-up study targeting at Hong Kong smokers who are motivated to quit smoking. Results from the proposed study show added values both in theoretical and practical perspectives. Theoretically, it extends our understanding of SDT in predicting people’s smoking reduction. Practically, the model may offer grounds for future smoking cessation campaigns promotion strategies and clinical smoking cessation services. (SS07410)


  • ‘CUHK’ Hong Kong Quality of Life Index – Socio-Cultural Sub-Index
  • SHEK Tan Lei Daniel, LEE Paul Siu Nam (School of Journalism and Communication), MAK Wing Sze Winnie (Psychology), TING Kwok Fai (Sociology), MA Ngok (Government & Public Administration)
    1 May 2008
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    The CUHK Hong Kong Quality of Life Index, which aims to assess and monitor the quality of life in Hong Kong, is a composite index incorporating both objective and subjective measure. This index, developed by the Faculty of Social Science of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, employs data collected in representative sample survey and official statistics. A wide range of life domains is covered and the year 2002 is taken as the base year of study. Index scores over the last four years demonstrate that in general the quality of life in Hong Kong has improved continuously since 2003. Generally, scores of the composite index and the three sub-indices on sectorial performance are somewhat higher than those of the previous years. It is noteworthy that Hong Kong has made noticeable progress and performs as well as many economically advanced societies in certain life domains. Yet, the well-begin of the people relies on further improvement in others.
    As part of the CUHK Hong Kong Quality of Life Index, The socio-cultural sub-index consists of indicators relating to different disciplines of study. For example, mortality rate and notification rate of notifiable infectious disease measure the aspect of physical health. Stress index and general life satisfaction measure psychological well-being of Hong Kong people. Press freedom and press criticism indices reflect the cultural and media aspects of Hong Kong society. As for government performance index and overall crime rate, they reveal the political and judicial aspects in Hong Kong. (SS07863)


  • Cultural Attributional Model of Public- and Affiliate-, and Self-Stigma for Individuals with Major and Minor Psychiatric Disorders
  • MAK Wing Sze Winnie, CHEUNG Fanny Mui Ching, WOO Jean (Medicine & Therapeutics)
    1 September 2004
    Research Grants Council (Earmarked Grants)

    Stigma has been identified as a major source of many psychological, behavioral, and sociopolitical phenomena. Individuals’ quality of life, social relations, and major life opportunities diminish as the result of being relegated to a stigmatized status. Despite its significance on social minorities, local studies on stigma were generally descriptive and tended to focus on the perspective of the general public without regard to the target individuals and their affiliates. The singular focus and descriptive nature precluded the opportunity to explore the underlying social-cognitive mechanisms that may explicate the process of stigmatization as well as any unique cultural or contextual factors that may put Chinese particularly prone to stigmatization of social minorities.
    The proposed study will elucidate the mechanisms by which public-, affiliate-, and self-stigma of mental illness affect the well-being and recovery process of individuals with major or minor psychiatric disorders in Hong Kong. By linking the concomitant psychosocial factors related to the stigma experience of individuals with mental illness within the Chinese context, the study aims to unpackage the pluralistic construct of stigma. The understanding of these social-cognitive and cultural processes can better position researchers and service providers to design empirically based and effective stigma reduction interventions and prevention programs. (CU04145)


  • Development and Validation of Clinical Risks and Needs Evaluation Measures for Offenders
  • LEUNG Wing Leung Patrick, CHEUNG Fanny Mui Ching, MAK Wing Sze Winnie
    1 January 2003
    Correctional Services Department, HKSAR Government

    This project aims at developing and validating clinical risks and needs evaluation measures for offenders, including adult violent offenders, sex offenders, and young offenders. It is a project in collaboration with the Correctional Services Department, Hong Kong SAR Government. It is estimated that the project will take about two-and-a-half years to complete. (SS02348)


  • Experience of Stigma: Its Multifaceted Effects on Social Minorities
  • >MAK Wing Sze Winnie
    1 December 2003
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    Social stigma has gained much attention in social psychological and health services research. Previous studies tend to focus on a single perspective and on a particular condition of concern. To more comprehensively understand the experience of stigma and its effects on help-seeking, caregiving, and mental health, the proposed study attempts to use both qualitative and quantitative methods to elucidate core psychosocial and cultural factors that may be related to stigmatization of different social minorities (e.g. individuals with mental illness, individuals with intellectual disability, new arrivals from Mainland China). Moreover, the proposed study aims to understand the effects of stigma on psychological well-being and illness behaviors from different perspectives (from the public, the stigmatized, or their close associates). The significance of this study rests in providing a common basis from which we can understand stigma across different social minorities, which can further lead us into designing effective, empirically based, and ecologically valid stigma reduction campaigns in Hong Kong. (SS03502)


  • Mental Illness Stigma Reduction Program
  • MAK Wing Sze Winnie
    27 December 2006
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    The study tests the effectiveness of a newly developed stigma-reduction program for mental illness with traditional educational program and control in a random sample of secondary school students in Hong Kong. By combining interpersonal contact, that has been shown to be an effective ingredient in reducing stigma, with a theoretical framework that is based on the self-regulatory model, the proposed program aims to change participants’ attitudes towards mental illness in seven social cognitive dimensions (i.e., identity, cause, timeline, consequence, control, emotional representations of the illness, and overall illness coherence). Findings of the study will provide evidence to a new approach that can potentially reduce mental illness stigma systematically in the community. If we can change the way public view mental illness and communicate with each other about it, we can potentially reduce their stigmatization and facilitate help-seeking for mental health problems for the community at large. (SS06664)


  • Stigma of Early Psychosis: Does the Label Matter?
  • MAK Wing Sze Winnie, LAU Tak Fai Joseph (Centre for Epidemiology & Biostatistics), Tsang Pui Shan*
    15 March 2005
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    The study aims to examine the effect of labeling on stigma of individuals with psychotic features through an attributional model. Subsequent affect and discriminating behaviors will also be explored. As a stigma reduction and early intervention scheme, the Hospital Authority of Hong Kong has introduced the label of “Early Psychosis” for early onset schizophrenia since 2000. However, its effect in the reduction of stigma among young adults with early psychosis has not been empirically examined since its introduction. The present study attempts to (1) explore the difference in stigma cued by different sick labels, (2) identify cognitive attributes of positive symptoms and negative symptoms, (3) examine the effect of gender in the perception of individual with mental illness, and (4) assess the knowledge of the general public about early psychosis. The target population of the public survey is the general population aged 18 to 60 who speak Cantonese in all domestic households in Hong Kong. A total of 800 participants will be surveyed over telephone. A 3 (sick label) x 2 (gender of the young adult) x 2 (psychiatric symptoms) factorial design will be used in 12 vignettes to tap the cognitive affective, and behavioral responses of the consented participants towards a young adult with psychotic features. The significance of this study rests in providing a comprehensive understanding of the attributional patterns of different illness label from the general public, which may inform us in designing effective, empirically-based, and ecologically-valid stigma reduction campaign in Hong Kong. (SS04749)



Research Publications


  • "Adjustment of Individuals Infected with HIV in Hong Kong: Contribution of Physical and Psychosocial Factors" (co-authored with MO P. K. H.). Paper presented in the The 9th British Psychological Society Division of Health Psychology Conference. United Kingdom, Essex, 2006.09.



  • "Application of the PRECEDE Model in Mental Health Promotion among Hong Kong Citizens" (co-authored with MO P. K. H.). Paper presented in the The 26th International Congress of Applied Psychology. Greece, Athens, 2006.07.



  • "Application of the PRECEDE model to understanding mental health promoting behaviors in Hong Kong" (co-authored with MO Phoenix K. H.). Health Education and Behavior vol.35 no.4, 2008.05. pp.574-587.
    (CUHK Library Call No: Available Online)



  • "Caregiving perceptions of Chinese mothers of children with intellectual disability in Hong Kong" (co-authored with HO Sze Man Gladys). Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities vol.20 no.2, 2007. pp.145-156.
    (CUHK Library Call No: Available Online)



  • "The Center for Epidemiologic Studies - Depression Scale Revised (CESD-R): Validation of the Chinese Version in Hong Kong" (co-authored with LEUNG S. Y. C.). Poster presentation at the World Congress of Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies. Spain, Barcelona, 2007.07.



  • "Coming Out among Sexual Minorities in Hong Kong: Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior and the Moderating Role of Attitudinal Ambivalence" (co-authored with CHEUNG E. Y. L. and NG A. C.). Poster presentation at the World Congress of Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies. Spain, Barcelona, 2007.07.



  • "Community psychology in a borrowed place with borrowed time: The case of Hong Kong" (co-authored with CHENG Sheung-tak). International Community Psychology: History and Theories ed. by S. Reich, M. Riemer, I. Prilleltensky, & M. Montero. New York: Kluwer Academic/Springer, 2008.02. pp.200-216.
    (CUHK Library Call No: MD WM30.6 .I575 2007)



  • "Comparative Stigma of HIV/AIDS, SARS, and Tuberculosis in Hong Kong" (co-authored with MO Kit Han, CHEUNG Yuen Man Rebecca, WONG Jean Woo, CHEUNG Fanny Mui Ching and LEE Tak Shing Dominic). Social Science & Medicine 2006.



  • "Cultural Change and Chinese Immigrants' Distress and Help-Seeking in Hong Kong" (co-authored with MO K. H. Phoenix. and KWAN S. Y. Carrie). Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work vol.15 The Haworth Press, Inc., 2006. pp.129-151.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Periodical HV3176 .J68 v.15, 2006)



  • "Effectiveness of Mental Illness Stigma Reduction Program through Contact and Self-regulation in Hong Kong". The 11th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Poster presentation. United States, Pasadena, 2007.06.



  • "Help-Seeking for Psychological Problems in Hong Kong: Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior" (co-authored with CHEUNG R. Y. M.). Paper presented in the The 26th International Congress of Applied Psychology. Greece, Athens, 2006.07.



  • "Intentionality of Medication Nonadherence for HIV+ Patients in Hong Kong" (co-authored with MO P. K. H. ). 2007 World Congress of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies Spain, Barcelona, 2007.07.



  • "Investigating Service-Related Perceptions in Relation to Quality of Life of Mental Health Consumers in Hong Kong" (co-authored with WU C. F. M. and WAN D. L. Y.). Paper presented in the World Mental Health Congress, organized by World Federation of Mental Health. Hong Kong, 2007.08.



  • "Neighborhood Structure and Personal Mental Health: A Regional Study in Hong Kong" (co-authored with CHEUNG E. Y. L.). Paper presented in the 26th International Congress of Applied Psychology. Greece, Athens, 2006.07.



  • "Psychiatric Stigma in Hong Kong: The Application of the Self-Regulatory Model". Paper presented in the 26th International Congress of Applied Psychology. Greece, Athens, 2006.07.



  • "Quality of Life of Mental Health Consumers in Hong Kong: Analysis of Service Perceptions" (co-authored with WU F.M. Crystal and WAN L.Y. Deborah ). Quality of Life Research vol.16, 2006.07.27. pp.31-40.
    (CUHK Library Call No: Available Online)



  • "Self-stigma and Attribution of Discrimination among Mainland Chinese New Arrivals in Hong Kong" (co-authored with CHUNG Chun Yan). Paper presented in the 28th International Congress of Psychology, organized by Chinese Psychological Society, Beijing, 2004.08.



  • "Self-stigma on Depression among Immigrants in Hong Kong" (co-authored with LAW L. S. C.). Poster presentation at the 11th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action. United States, Pasadena, 2007.06.



  • "Sense of Coherence as Mediator in Stress-Distress Relationship among Individuals in Poverty in Hong Kong" (co-authored with CHEUNG E. Y. L.). Paper presented in the The 26th International Congress of Applied Psychology. Greece, Athens, 2006.07.



  • "Sense of Coherence, Parenting Attitudes and Stress among Mothers of Children with Autism in Hong Kong" (co-authored with HO H. Y. Anna and LAW WING MAN RITA). Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities 2006 2006.03.
    (CUHK Library Call No: Available Online)



  • "Sense of coherence, parenting attitudes, and stress among mothers of children with autism in Hong Kong." (co-authored with HO H. Y. Anna and LAW WING MAN RITA). Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities vol.20 no.2, 2007. pp.157-167.
    (CUHK Library Call No: Available Online)



  • "Sexuality among Chinese mental health consumers in halfway houses of Hong Kong" (co-authored with WONG I. W. Y.). Psychiatric Services vol.59 no.7, 2008.05. pp.803-807.
    (CUHK Library Call No: Available Online)



  • "Understanding distress: The role of face concern among Chinese Americans, European Americans, Hong Kong Chinese, and Mainland Chinese" (co-authored with CHEN S. X.; LAM A. G. and YIU V. F. L.). The Counselling Psychologist 2008.06.


* Name of external researcher
# Name of staff who has left the University