LEUNG Yiu Kin Freedom 梁耀堅

Research Projects


  • Comparison of Psychological Characteristics of Adolescent Girls Displaying Bulimic Behaviors in Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong
  • LEUNG Yiu Kin Freedom, QIAN Ming Yi*
    1 April 2001
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    psychological characteristics of adolescent girls displaying bulimic behaviors in Hong Kong, Beijing, and Shanghai. One thousand adolescent girls in each of the three cities will be tested. To explore possible developmental differences in the manifestation of bulimic features across different developmental stages, comparable number of subjects in two different age groups (age 12-14 and age 15-18) will be recruited. Subjects will complete a questionnaire package designed specifically to assess bulimic behaviors and relevant psychological characteristics. The prevalence rates of different bulimic behaviors among girls in the three cities will be examined and compared. Psychological characteristics of purgers (those who self-induced vomiting and abuse laxatives) and nonpurgers (those who do not purge) will be explored. Multivariate relationship patterns among bulimic features and the associated physical and psychological characteristics in the three samples will also be examined. Structural equation analyses will be conducted to explore potential causal relationships among different psychological variables in the development of bulimic behaviors in the three cities. Findings from this study will provide valuable information to mental health professionals about the extent and nature of bulimic behaviors among adolescent girls in Hong Kong, Beijing, and Shanghai. Comparing findings from people of the same ethnic heritage but growing up in different physical and social environment may also reveal interesting socioenvironmental variables that play a role in the development of bulimic behaviors. (SS00914)


  • Does a Fragile Sense of Self Predict Eating Pathology among Chinese Adolescent Girls in Hong Kong and Beijing? A 2-year Follow-up Study
  • LEUNG Yiu Kin Freedom, WANG Jianping*
    1 June 2003
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    A fragile sense of self has long been implicated in the development of eating disorders. Findings from previous high-risk studies in the West generally support that low self-esteem is a valid vulnerability marker for future eating disorders. Recent theory and evidence, however, suggest that there is much more to self-esteem than whether it is high or low, and instability or fragility of self-esteem is an even more important construct in predicting psychological functioning. To extent knowledge in this area, the present study will examine the utility of the two components of self-esteem (both the level and fragility of self-esteem) in predicting eating pathology among Chinese adolescent girls in Hong Kong and Beijing in a 2-year follow-up study. Four thousand adolescents girls, 2000 from Hong Kong and Beijing respectively, between the ages of 11 and 13 will be recruited for the study. Subjects will be tested at three different time points over a period of two years with various measures assessing a fragile sense of self, parenting styles, unstable mood trait, weight and shape related variables, and eating symptoms. The following research questions will be addressed: (1) Does a fragile sense of self predict future eating pathology among Chinese adolescent girls in Hong Kong and Beijing? (2) What are the causal relationships among parenting styles, unstable mood trait, self-esteem problems, and other weight and shape related variables in the development of pathological eating? (3) Will sociocultural differences between Hong Kong and Beijing contribute to different result patterns across cities? Findings from this study will shed light on processes and mechanisms that help transform a fragile sense of self into pathological eating. (SS02932)


  • Does Behavioral Inhibition Predict Later Anxiety Disorders among Chinese Adolescents in Hong Kong And Beijing? A 2-Year Follow-up Study
  • LEUNG Yiu Kin Freedom, WANG Jianping*, WONG Max*, WONG Tony*
    1 June 2002
    CUHK Research Committee Funding (Direct Grants)

    The present study will examine the construct of behavioral inhibition as a vulnerability marker for anxiety disorders among Chinese adolescents in Hong Kong and Beijing. We will also explore how parenting styles and other individual psychological characteristics may moderate or mediate the effect of inhibition in the development of pathological anxiety. Six thousand adolescents, 4000 from Hong Kong and 2000 from Beijing, between the ages of 11 and 13 will be recruited for the study. Subjects will be tested at three different time points over a period of two years with various measures assessing temperamental inhibition, parenting styles, individual affective, cognitive, and behavioral characteristics, and anxiety symptoms. In this study, we will try to answer the following research questions: (1) Does temperamental inhibition predicts future anxiety disorders among Chinese adolescents in Hong Kong and Beijing? (2) What are the causal relationships among temperamental inhibition, parenting styles, individual affective, cognitive and behavioral styles in the development of pathological anxiety? (3) Will sociocultural differences between Hong Kong and Beijing result in different result patterns across cities? Findings from this study will shed light on processes and mechanisms that help transform temperamental inhibition into pathological anxiety. Cross-cultural comparison of findings between Hong Kong and Beijing, or between the East and West, may also enhance our understanding of how environment moderates the effect of temperament in the development of anxiety disorders across cultures. (SS01485)



Research Publications


  • "Body Attitudes and Disordered Eating Behaviors among Chinese Adolescent Girls of Different Weight Categories in Hong Kong" (co-authored with CHAN I. W. S.). Paper presented in the 16th Biennial Meetings of International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development, organized by Biennial International Society Beijing, China, 2000.07.14.



  • "Body Attitudes and Eating Behaviors among Chinese Female Dancers in Hong Kong" (co-authored with MAK C.). Paper presented in the 16th Biennial Meetings of International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development, organized by Biennial International Society Beijing, China, 2000.07.14.



  • "Body Attitudes and Eating Behaviors among Elementary School Girls in Hong Kong" (co-authored with LEE C.). Paper presented in the 16th Biennial Meetings of International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development, organized by Biennial International Society Beijing, China, 2000.07.13.



  • "Body Concerns and Disordered Eating Behaviors Among Adult Chinese Women in Hong Kong" (co-authored with LAU C.). Paper presented in the 2002 International Conference on Eating Disorders and Clinical Teaching Day, organized by Academy for Eating Disorders Boston, USA, 2002.04.28.



  • "Body Image and Disordered Eating Behaviors among Hong Kong Adolescent Boys" (co-authored with SOU N. W.). Paper presented in the Hong Kong Psychological Society Annual Conference 2005, 2005.06.



  • "The Construct Validity of Borderline Personality Disorder among Chinese Adolescents in Hong Kong" (co-authored with LEUNG S. W.). Paper presented in the 2007 World Congress of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Spain, Barcelona, 2007.



  • "Developmental Changes in Satisfaction Levels Toward Facial and Bodily Features among Chinese Adolescent Girls in Hong Kong" (co-authored with LEUNG Candice). Paper presented in the 16th Biennial Meetings of International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development, organized by Biennial International Society Beijing, China, 2000.07.14.



  • "Disordered Eating Attitudes and Behaviors among Chinese Adolescent Boys in Hong Kong" (co-authored with MAK T.). Paper presented in the 17th World Congress on Psychosomatic Medicine, organized by International College of Psychosomatic Medicine, Hawaii, 2003.08.



  • "Disordered Eating Attitudes and Behaviors among Chinese Adolescent Girls in Hong Kong" (co-authored with LAM Yuen Yan Sharon and CHAN Wing Sau). Journal of Youth Studies vol.4 no.1, Hong Kong SAR, 2001.01. pp.36-50.
    (CUHK Library Call No: UL Periodical HQ793 .J68 v.4, 2001; Available Online)



  • "Examining the Psychometric Properties of the Interoceptive Awareness Subscale of the Eating Disorders Inventory among Chinese Adult Women in Hong Kong" (co-authored with LEUNG S. W. Sandy). Paper presented in the Hong Kong Psychological Society Annual Conference 2005. 2005.06.



  • "Impulsivity in Hong Kong-Chinese club-drug users" (co-authored with LOXTON N. J., WAN V.; HO A., CHEUNG B., TAM N. and STADLIN A). Drug and Alcohol Dependence vol.95 pp.81-89. 2008.06.
    (CUHK Library Call No: Available Online)



  • "Invalidating Family Environment and Borderline Personality Features among Adolescents in Hong Kong" (co-authored with LEE E.). Paper presented in the Conference on Developmental Psychology in the New Millennium, organized by Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Hong Kong SAR, 2000.07.07.



  • "Psychometric Properties and Normative Data of the Eating Disorder Inventory among 12 to 18 Year Old Chinese Gilrs in Hong Kong" (co-authored with WANG Jianping and TANG Wai Yee). Journal of Psychosomatic Research vol.57. USA: Elsevier Inc., 2004. pp.59-66.
    (CUHK Library Call No: MD Periodical W1 .J89 v.57, 2004)



  • "Self-Mutilating Behavior and Borderline Personality Features among Hong Kong Adolescents" (co-authored with CHAN Hoi Ka). Paper presented in the Developmental Psychology In The New Millennium Meeting, organized by Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Hong Kong SAR, 2000.07.07.


* Name of external researcher
# Name of staff who has left the University